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Safety Tips for Teenage Drivers

July 4, 2013







Safe Driving

Teenagers may be at a much higher risk of being involved in accidents compared to other age groups. That’s because teenagers have lesser driving experience, and may not have the kind of fine-tuned skills that are necessary to recognize and identify accident cues, and avoid collisions.

Teenagers may be at a much higher risk of being involved in accidents compared to other age groups.  That’s because teenagers have lesser driving experience, and may not have the kind of fine-tuned skills that are necessary to recognize and identify accident cues, and avoid collisions.

However, that doesn’t mean that teenagers cannot drive safely at all.  Lack of experience and skills can be offset by prudent and responsible driving, that includes avoiding unnecessary and undesirable driving behaviors.

For instance, a teenager can increase his chances of avoiding an accident simply by switching off his cell phone while driving.  Distracted driving among teenagers is almost at epidemic proportions, and teenagers can help reduce the risks of being involved in an accident, by switching off their cell phone when they begin driving.  California bans the use of hand-held cell phones as well as text messaging behind the wheel for all motorists, and teenagers need to be especially cognizant of these laws.

Some experts also recommend that teenage drivers keep their headlights switched on, so that other drivers can see them.

Stay at safe speeds.  Avoid driving at excessive speeds.  Avoid participating in stunt driving with teenage friends, and avoid street racing.

Cell phones are not the only source of distraction for teenage drivers.  Many of them are often distracted because they’re changing CDs or radio stations while driving, or because they are snacking or drinking beverages.  Make sure that you’re performing no other activity while driving, and minimize the number of distractions before driving.  Make sure that your MP3 player is all set with tracks to last you through your drive.  Switch off your cell phone and keep it out of reach.

 

 

Posted by Robert Reeves at 1:12 pm - no comments
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